The Hohenbuchau Collection arrives at the Bruce Museum

Paulus Moreelse’s Periander, The Tyrant of Corinth (625-585 BC) an oil on canvas is part of the Hohenbuchau Collection, on Permanent Loan to Liechtenstein. It will be part of the Bruce’s new exhibition.

Paulus Moreelse’s Periander, The Tyrant of Corinth (625-585 BC) an oil on canvas is part of the Hohenbuchau Collection, on Permanent Loan to Liechtenstein. It will be part of the Bruce’s new exhibition.

One of the largest and most varied collections of northern Baroque art assembled anywhere in recent decades will be on view at the Bruce Museum beginning this month.

Northern Baroque Splendor, The Hohenbuchau Collection from Liechtenstein, The Princely Collections, Vienna will be displayed across multiple galleries at the Bruce beginning on Sept. 20 and continuing through April 12, 2015.

The Hohenbuchau Collection was gathered by Otto Christian and Renate Fassbender and has been on long-term loan to the Collections of the Prince of Liechtenstein in Vienna, where it was exhibited in its entirety in the former Liechtenstein Museum in 2011.

The selective showing of The Hohenbuchau Collection at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich is the show’s inaugural venue in the United States. In April, the exhibition will travel from Greenwich to the Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio.

Primarily comprised of Dutch and Flemish 17th-century paintings, the collection exhibits all the naturalism, visual probity and technical brilliance for which those schools are famous.

While many modern collections of old masters specialize in a single style or subject matter, the Hohenbuchau Collection is admirable for offering examples of virtually all the genres produced by Lowland artists — history painting, portraiture, genre, landscapes, seascapes, still lifes and flower pieces, animal paintings and hunting scenes.

“The Hohenbuchau Collection is not only remarkable for offering examples of virtually all the genres produced by Netherlandish Old Masters, but also for the rich diversity of size, format, and subject within each genre,” said Peter Sutton, executive sirector of the Bruce Museum and the organizer of the exhibition.

“Particularly unique to the collection are the number of individual paintings executed by more than one artist, working in collaboration. Netherlandish artists tended to specialize, whether in figures, landscapes or still lifes, but they were not averse to collaboration.”

The collection is also distinguished for its emphasis on history painting, subjects sometimes neglected by modern collectors, featuring outstanding Mannerist (Joachim Wtewael, Abraham Bloemaert, and Cornelis van Haarlem), Utrecht Caravaggisti (Gerard van Honthorst and Hendrick ter Brugghen) and Flemish and German history paintings.

“With its colorful diversity, naturalism and technical brilliance, the show will appeal to the general public, but there are also surprises for the specialist and connoisseur,” Dr. Sutton said.

“For example, the only known signed pictures by several artists. This rare show affords the Bruce Museum a unique opportunity not only to share world-class masterpieces with Greenwich and surrounding towns, but also to offer a rare educational opportunity to learn from leaders in the field of 17th century Dutch and Flemish art.”

The Bruce Museum will host an international symposium on Oct. 25 as an educational programming complement to the Northern Baroque Splendor exhibition.

The symposium will feature some of the world’s foremost authorities on Old Master paintings, Dutch and Flemish art, and The Hohenbuchau Collection, including Frederik J. Duparc, Christopher Brown, Walter A. Liedtke and Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., and the museum’s own Dr. Sutton. The conference will provide an interactive forum for an open exchange of knowledge and expertise among these leaders in the study of Dutch and Flemish art of the 17th century and the general public.

The exhibition is underwritten by the Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition fund and a committee of honor co-chaired by Patricia and John Chadwick, Carol and George Crapple, Myrna Haft, Gale and Bob Lawrence, and Michel Witmer with the support of the Department of Economic and Community Development as well as corporate and foundation support provided by Sotheby’s, The David T. Langrock Foundation and The Netherland-America Foundation Inc.

Additional programming supporting the exhibition includes the Bob and Pam Goergen Lecture Series, which will be held this year on Oct. 2, featuring Dr. Sutton; Nov. 13, featuring Rubens scholar and author Kristin Belkin; and Dec. 4, featuring Wayne Franits, professor, author and scholar of Dutch genre painting.

For additional information, call 203-869-0376 or visit Brucemuseum.org.

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