Denver Broncos no match for Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl 48

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The Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks met up in New York/New Jersey's Super Bowl 48. In the end, it was all Seattle, as the Seahawks won the Vince Lombardi Trophy 43-8. — Paul Silverfarb photo

The Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks met up in New York/New Jersey’s Super Bowl 48. In the end, it was all Seattle, as the Seahawks won the Vince Lombardi Trophy 43-8. — Paul Silverfarb photo

Updated: Monday, Feb. 3 at 2:59 a.m.: Well, that didn’t turn out the way we all thought it would, huh? From my seats, it was hard to tell whether Peyton Manning that had an off-day, the Seattle defense was that dominant or the Denver offensive line gave Manning zero seconds to get rid of the ball. It also didn’t help that the receiving core for Denver seems slow and the running game was non-existent.

However, we need to give credit where credit is due. Seattle was bigger, faster and stronger during Super Bowl 48 and earned their 43-8 victory. Congrats to Seattle on winning the Super Bowl for the first time in franchise history. A job well done.

In the first outdoor Super Bowl in cold weather, the game also had a bunch of firsts. When the Broncos coughed up the ball in the end zone and Seattle netted the safety 12 seconds into the game, that was the quickest score from the start of the game. And since the Seahawks didn’t relinquish the lead, they also netted the Super Bowl record for the most playing time in the lead (59 minutes, 48 seconds).

Although Denver only mustered eight points in the contest, quarterback Peyton Manning threw 34 completions, the most in Super Bowl history. In addition, Denver wide receiver Demaryius Thomas netted 13 catches and that was a Super Bowl record as well.

Okay, so sue me. I wanted my picture taken at the Super Bowl. — Sam Adams, KHQ-TV (Spokane, Wash.) sports director

Okay, so sue me. I wanted my picture taken at the Super Bowl. — photo by Sam Adams, KHQ-TV (Spokane, Wash.) sports director

For me, this experience was a first as well. I’ve ever been to a Super Bowl. Although it seemed like the Seahawks were in cruise control throughout most of the game, this was still an experience I’ll never forget.

My seat was 41 rows up from the Seattle end zone and I’ll be honest, that was an amazing place to watch a football game. I was in the crowd, and boy were they loud. From when Queen Latifah sang God Bless America to the team introductions (pyrotechnics included) to when Renee Fleming sang a gorgeous rendition of our National Anthem, the crowd was fired up.

Speaking of fired up, there was actually a reason why I was unable to post more to Greenwich-post.com. Because I knew I was going to be in the auxiliary press box, I packed light for this trip. No laptop. Just my iPhone, charger, iPad, notebook and pen. After all, my seat had no press table in front of it. It was a seat, just like the over 80,000 fans got to use.

We were inching our way to the start of Super Bowl 48 at Met Life Stadium. The crowd is quickly filing in and the teams just finished their first walk-through. I wasn’t able to update much and that’s due to heat…yup, heat. Where I was sitting, there were heat lamps throughout the auxiliary press section. While being covered form the elements was amazing and it was nice not to wear my jacket, it felt like I was tanning at South Beach. Don’t be surprised if you see me in Greenwich and I have a wicked sun burn. Holy heat lamps, Batman. Any ways, due to the extreme heat, my iPad actually shut down on me and needed to cool down. Every time it finally was cool enough to use, I would turn the iPad back on, start typing and…yeah, you get the picture. Ugh!

Other than the sauna, I mean auxiliary press box heating issues, this was one amazing experience. Starting in the morning, when I actually picked up the Super Bowl press pass, to riding the shuttle bus from the Sheraton Times Square to Met Life Stadium, to going through countless security checks, everybody couldn’t have been nicer.

Preparation is well underway for the Pepsi Halftime Show, staring Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. — Paul Silverfarb photo

Preparation is well underway for the Pepsi Halftime Show, staring Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. — Paul Silverfarb photo

With the game turning into a laugher and knowing that I got a full day of fun and excitement at the Greenwich Post tomorrow later today, I figured leaving early would be a good thing. And that it was.

With seven minutes to play, I left the stadium and headed towards the bus that will take me from Met Life Stadium back to the Sheraton in Time Square. I boarded the coach bus, took my seat and the 12 other journalists and I enjoyed a quiet ride. We saw the fireworks from the stadium, as the Seahawks made it official. While on the highway towards the Lincoln Tunnel, the Empire State Building was in the distance and it put on a light show for several minutes. Once it stopped, the colors green and blue (Seattle Seahawks colors) lit the spire and top of the building.

While my ride was relaxing and quiet, there weren’t a lot of other people that could say that, as we heard that the mass transit stations at Met Life Stadium were overloaded with people and the lines for the media buses were long. Fans were actually instructed to stay in the stadium to hang around and enjoy the atmosphere.

While it’s nearly 3 a.m. and I can barely see the laptop screen any more, I have little to complain about. I got to hear the misery about a West Coast team playing in New York. Sam Adams, sports director for KHQ-TV out of Spokane, Wash., and I were chatting throughout the day and when I mentioned I might leave early, he simply laughed. It turns out that Adams still had the 11 p.m. news to broadcast…out of Spokane. That means while I am writing this, Adams is most likely still at Met Life Stadium.

Oh, and one more thing before I call it a night. With all the talk throughout the week about how both teams are going to handle the weather at Met Life Stadium and how the fans are going to have to brave the elements, it’s interesting to point out that the temperature at kickoff was 49 degrees and the wind wasn’t a factor. That’s not the coldest Super Bowl ever played…or the second coldest.

The coldest Super Bowl was Super Bowl VI, played in New Orleans, where the temperature at kickoff was 39 degrees. Again in New Orleans for Super Bowl IX, the kickoff temperature was a brisk 46 degrees. Oh well, so much for the weather playing a factor.

As for me, I am done. I started the day at 8 a.m. on Sunday and finished by adventure close to 3 a.m. on Monday. I’ll post a video or two of my experience at @greenwichpost, so check them out on twitter. I hope you all enjoyed my postings leading up to the game. It was a lot of fun and an experience I’ll never forget.

And the perfect way to put the day in perspective. As I desperately tried to be quiet when I finally arrived home, the ears of two five-year-old boys still heard the front door open and couldn’t be more excited. So, at 2 a.m., both boys asked what took me so long to get home. When I told them that I came back from the Super Bowl, the only question both Connor and Lucas had for me was: “Did you see the mascots?”

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